From the snippets of conversation I overheard - it was getting late, and the centre was growing quiet - this girl and her mother were waiting for transport to take them back to another hospital. I was drawn to her green hair, and had to get a quick drawing in.

Waiting is something that every cancer patient is intimately familiar with. From hour-long waits for clinic, to "We're just waiting for your blood results to come back." The wait for a bed to open up, or a nurse to be available, or your meds to arrive from pharmacy.

Time runs differently in hospitals. You soon learn that "in a sec" usually turns into ten or fifteen minutes, and "soon" is an empty promise. It's not necessarily the fault of the nurses, who are usually run off their feet, and half-buried in paperwork, on top of having to care for us; but the long waits are almost as exhausting, if not more so, than actually having treatment.

If you're wondering, this is the TYA lounge, a special area of the centre set up for kids and their parents to wait in. And, of course, I drew this while my dad and I were sitting about, waiting. I've forgotten what we were waiting for, this time; it was such a frequent occurence.

From the snippets of conversation I overheard - it was getting late, and the centre was growing quiet - this girl and her mother were waiting for transport to take them back to another hospital. I was drawn to her green hair, and had to get a quick drawing in.

Waiting is something that every cancer patient is intimately familiar with. From hour-long waits for clinic, to "We're just waiting for your blood results to come back." The wait for a bed to open up, or a nurse to be available, or your meds to arrive from pharmacy.

Time runs differently in hospitals. You soon learn that "in a sec" usually turns into ten or fifteen minutes, and "soon" is an empty promise. It's not necessarily the fault of the nurses, who are usually run off their feet, and half-buried in paperwork, on top of having to care for us; but the long waits are almost as exhausting, if not more so, than actually having treatment.

If you're wondering, this is the TYA lounge, a special area of the centre set up for kids and their parents to wait in. And, of course, I drew this while my dad and I were sitting about, waiting. I've forgotten what we were waiting for, this time; it was such a frequent occurence.