Temperature is difficult to balance as a cancer patient.

Losing all your hair tends to make you feel the cold a lot more. Most chemo patients have a healthy supply of hats, from lightweight chemo caps to heavy fleece beanies, so we are prepared for all weathers. We often bundle up in more layers than most people, because we seem to feel the cold a lot more. During treatment, nurses commonly offer thermal blankets to wrap ourselves up in. Many chemo patients end up wrapping themselves up like human canneloni in the recliners. If you have a PICC line - a kind of long-term cannula inserted in the upper arm - you're pretty much stuck wearing tshirts, no matter the time of year, so nurses can get to your PICC, so blankets are a life saver.

Perhaps in an effort to combat this, the TYA treatment centre always seemed to have their heating on at full blast, which meant that in summer, we were all complaining that we were too warm - especially the families, who didn't have the lack-of-hair issue troubling them.

However, hot weather can be a hazard too. Chemo often makes you more susceptible to burning in the sun, so heavily-applied sunblock and lightweight, loose clothes are important. Some drugs make you prone to hot flashes as well, which adds to the complication. Do you have a temperature because you're sick, or are you just sweating because of that Oramorph you took?

Temperature is difficult to balance as a cancer patient.

Losing all your hair tends to make you feel the cold a lot more. Most chemo patients have a healthy supply of hats, from lightweight chemo caps to heavy fleece beanies, so we are prepared for all weathers. We often bundle up in more layers than most people, because we seem to feel the cold a lot more. During treatment, nurses commonly offer thermal blankets to wrap ourselves up in. Many chemo patients end up wrapping themselves up like human canneloni in the recliners. If you have a PICC line - a kind of long-term cannula inserted in the upper arm - you're pretty much stuck wearing tshirts, no matter the time of year, so nurses can get to your PICC, so blankets are a life saver.

Perhaps in an effort to combat this, the TYA treatment centre always seemed to have their heating on at full blast, which meant that in summer, we were all complaining that we were too warm - especially the families, who didn't have the lack-of-hair issue troubling them.

However, hot weather can be a hazard too. Chemo often makes you more susceptible to burning in the sun, so heavily-applied sunblock and lightweight, loose clothes are important. Some drugs make you prone to hot flashes as well, which adds to the complication. Do you have a temperature because you're sick, or are you just sweating because of that Oramorph you took?