Many cancer patients who are having long-term treatments are advised to get a PICC line. It's essential for some treatments.

A PICC line is sort of like a long-term cannula. A thin tube is inserted into one of the veins in your upper arm, which can then be used to give medicine or draw blood. Some PICC lines have a forked end with two 'lumens' so two separate processes can be done at once - for example, being attached to a fluid backpack while also having IV chemotherapy.

Each week, the dressing covering your PICC needs to be changed, and the lumen/s flushed with saline. This is a slightly fiddly process, though not particularly complicated; it's usually recommended for a family member to learn how to do this, so they can handle changes at home if you're not in every week. My parents are both able to do mine, which is very useful, as I live over an hour away from the hospital.

Here, one of the nurses is changing a dressing for a patient.

Many cancer patients who are having long-term treatments are advised to get a PICC line. It's essential for some treatments.

A PICC line is sort of like a long-term cannula. A thin tube is inserted into one of the veins in your upper arm, which can then be used to give medicine or draw blood. Some PICC lines have a forked end with two 'lumens' so two separate processes can be done at once - for example, being attached to a fluid backpack while also having IV chemotherapy.

Each week, the dressing covering your PICC needs to be changed, and the lumen/s flushed with saline. This is a slightly fiddly process, though not particularly complicated; it's usually recommended for a family member to learn how to do this, so they can handle changes at home if you're not in every week. My parents are both able to do mine, which is very useful, as I live over an hour away from the hospital.

Here, one of the nurses is changing a dressing for a patient.