Technology can be a life saver, and it can also be a complete pain.

Most chemo patients soon settle in to their routine, and learn to entertain themselves during long treatment days. Phones, mp3 players, laptops and handheld games are commonplace; the nurses even keep extra phone chargers on hand sometimes, in case someone needs to borrow one.

However, it can also produce problems the likes of which can screw the whole building for a full fortnight. Halfway through my treatments in TYA, a new computer system was introduced to the Cancer Centre. The nurses had been given some training, but it still caused a lot of chaos, with prescriptions being lost, patients being booked in or out incorrectly, and seemingly hundreds of new boxes needing to be ticked to carry out every simple process.

"It's this new computer system!" (exclaimed with great frustration) was probably the most commonly used sentence in the building for a month or two.

Technology can be a life saver, and it can also be a complete pain.

Most chemo patients soon settle in to their routine, and learn to entertain themselves during long treatment days. Phones, mp3 players, laptops and handheld games are commonplace; the nurses even keep extra phone chargers on hand sometimes, in case someone needs to borrow one.

However, it can also produce problems the likes of which can screw the whole building for a full fortnight. Halfway through my treatments in TYA, a new computer system was introduced to the Cancer Centre. The nurses had been given some training, but it still caused a lot of chaos, with prescriptions being lost, patients being booked in or out incorrectly, and seemingly hundreds of new boxes needing to be ticked to carry out every simple process.

"It's this new computer system!" (exclaimed with great frustration) was probably the most commonly used sentence in the building for a month or two.