Light Through The Window
Light Through The Window

12x26" acrylic on canvas

In October 2020, I fractured my sacrum - the part of the pelvis which connects to the spine. It was incredibly painful, and left me unable to sit up straight for more than a few minutes. As such, my care team arranged for me to be brought to and from the hospital by stretcher transport. I was struck by how completely my perspective on the world was changed by this experience; lying down, looking up at everything from a prone angle.

Some of the ambulances had windows on the stretcher-side, and I could look out at the world if the blinds were up. The lower pane was darkened glass, so that if a bus or truck pulled up beside the ambulance, the passengers could not look in and see me in my vulnerable state. However, the top pane was normal glass, and this created an odd two-tone effect as I looked out at the world.

I was fascinated with the way I appeared to be looking at two times of day at once. The top pane ran several hours earlier than the bottom; it was late afternoon through one window, late evening through the other. Passing streetlights and shop signs cast interesting patterns of light and shadow through the window, and I took a series of photos on my phone, which later resulted in this painting.

Light Through The Window

12x26" acrylic on canvas

In October 2020, I fractured my sacrum - the part of the pelvis which connects to the spine. It was incredibly painful, and left me unable to sit up straight for more than a few minutes. As such, my care team arranged for me to be brought to and from the hospital by stretcher transport. I was struck by how completely my perspective on the world was changed by this experience; lying down, looking up at everything from a prone angle.

Some of the ambulances had windows on the stretcher-side, and I could look out at the world if the blinds were up. The lower pane was darkened glass, so that if a bus or truck pulled up beside the ambulance, the passengers could not look in and see me in my vulnerable state. However, the top pane was normal glass, and this created an odd two-tone effect as I looked out at the world.

I was fascinated with the way I appeared to be looking at two times of day at once. The top pane ran several hours earlier than the bottom; it was late afternoon through one window, late evening through the other. Passing streetlights and shop signs cast interesting patterns of light and shadow through the window, and I took a series of photos on my phone, which later resulted in this painting.